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Showing posts from July, 2009

Everyday Greatness

It was wonderful to be bathed in uplifting stories. The scope of the collection is bound to reach you at some point. Stephen Covey does an excellent job of combining the stories into different disciplines that are essential to what he deems "everyday greatness."

The quotes at the end of each chapter are full of memorable tidbits to be taken away and chewed on through out the day. The questions that Covey puts forward in each section are well thought out and to the point.

By far, my favorite section of the book was "Blending of Pieces." The stories express balance, simplicity and renewal in very insightful ways. The story that has been most beneficial to my current situation is "Two Words to Avoid, Two to Remember."

This collection has allowed me to pause in my day and to determine if I desire to pursue personal greatness or to just let each day pass. It is an excellent resource for individuals or groups. The questions at the end of the chapters can rea…

Rick and Bubba's Guide to the Almost Nearly Perfect Marriage

First of all, I am not a follower of Rick and Bubba. I am, however, a fan of marriage. There were numerous times while reading the book that I stopped and shared stories with my husband, mainly because they were comical in nature. It is not one of those books that I can foresee someone recommending in a premarital counseling session, nor would I personally suggest it to any friends experiencing marital problems. I would recommend the book to anyone who loves a good laugh.
One of the highlights in Rick and Bubba's Guide to the Almost Nearly Perfect Marriage is the chapter "Ball and Chain?" where Rick and Bubba declare that being married is the opposite of being tied down. It is in fact freedom. It is quite a beautiful understanding and description of the freedom that comes from trusting your spouse and the love that can grow between the two of you.
One part of the book that I could have done without is "The Book of Blame." Unfortunately, one of the underlying …